Me and a friend went to a talk that Irish Aid organised and it was western nonsense of course but the best worst part was seeing the room decorated with normal household appliances that my friend and I recognized and they were like ”these are examples of the exotic artifacts you will find in various African regions”

 it was just a fucking sweeping broom, they thought it was exotic, i keep one in my house to clean my bedroom, but it’s Africa, so it must be exotic, I was half laughing half pissed off. 

poc-creators:

Helen Oyememi wrote her first book while studying for her “A” levels in Britain. She is of Nigerian descent, and has earned critical raves for her work which includes four novels and two plays. She writes mostly speculative fiction.

Descriptions from Amazon.com

The Icarus Girl

White is for Witching

Miranda is at homehomesick, home sick …”

As a child, Miranda Silver developed pica, a rare eating disorder that causes its victims to consume nonedible substances. The death of her mother when Miranda is sixteen exacerbates her condition; nothing, however, satisfies a strange hunger passed down through the women in her family. And then there’s the family house in Dover, England, converted to a bed-and-breakfast by Miranda’s father. Dover has long been known for its hostility toward outsiders. But the Silver House manifests a more conscious malice toward strangers, dispatching those visitors it despises. Enraged by the constant stream of foreign staff and guests, the house finally unleashes its most destructive power.

With distinct originality and grace, and an extraordinary gift for making the fantastic believable, Helen Oyeyemi spins the politics of family and nation into a riveting and unforgettable mystery.

The Opposite House

Lyrical and intensely moving, The Opposite House explores the thin wall between myth and reality through the alternating tales of two young women. Growing up in London, Maja, a singer, always struggled to negotiate her Afro-Cuban background with her physical home. Yemaya is a Santeria emissary who lives in a mysterious somewherehouse with two doors: one opening to London, the other to Lagos. She is troubled by the ease with which her fellow emissaries have disguised themselves behind the personas of saints and by her inability to recognize them. Interweaving these two tales. Helen Oyeyemi, acclaimed author of The Icarus Girl, spins a dazzling tale about faith, identity, and self-discovery.

Mr. Fox

Fairytale romances end with a wedding. The fairytales that don’t get more complicated. In this book, celebrated writer Mr. Fox can’t stop himself from killing off the heroines of his novels, and neither can his wife, Daphne. It’s not until Mary, his muse, comes to life and transforms him from author into subject that his story begins to unfold differently. Meanwhile, Daphne becomes convinced that her husband is having an affair, and finds her way into Mary and Mr. Fox’s game. And so Mr. Fox is offered a choice: Will it be a life with the girl of his dreams, or a life with an all-too-real woman who delights him more than he cares to admit?

Junipers Whitening and Victimese

Juniper’s Whitening

“Tell me this - is it true that if you make someone die, and they come out the other side, it doesn’t matter? I’m sure something clung to Lazarus. Something must’ve shone through him.”

In Aleph, Beth and Juniper’s nightmare house, kindness is entrapment, and resurrection is a weapon. Aleph love/hates Beth, Beth love/hates Aleph, and all Juniper knows is that Beth can’t seem to stop being murdered.

One thing above all: none of them must look out of the window.

Victimese

“I was thinking, Eve, that you need to touch bottom - just so you know you can do it. So you know it’s not that difficult; so you know that you don’t have to tunnel far; so you know that you’re not that actually as deep as you think you are.”

Eve is unable to leave her student room but unable to bear staying in it. In harming herself she hopes to demonstrate her courage and independence to both herself and her friends. But her sister’s arrival and need for her friendship forces her to face painful truths and to examine whether it is possible to temper emotional courage with the humanity to give and ask for aid.

(via thefemaletyrant)

"I asked a young White woman why she was studying social anthropology. She replied that she was hoping to go to Zimbabwe, and felt that she could help women there by advising them how to organize. The Black women in the audience gasped in astonishment. Here was someone scarcely past girlhood, who had just started university and had never fought a war in her life. She was planning to go to Africa to teach female veterans of a liberation struggle how to organize! This is the kind of arrogant, if not absurd attitude we encounter repeatedly. It makes one think: Better the distant armchair anthropologists than these ‘sisters’."

African feminist Ifi Amadiume

(via newwavefeminism)

Great post (also Ifi is Nigerian)

lesbian & bisexual women’s group in Nigeria- Women’s Health & Equal Rights Initiative

Women’s Health & Equal Rights [WHER] Organisation is set up in Abuja, Nigeria to promote the health and empower lgbti women living in Nigeria. WHER aims to provide access to sexual reproductive health and rights information, advocate for lgbti rights in Nigeria and give support to women who experience abuse, violence, homelessness or hiv/aids.  Their number is +2348035603750  and are on facebook. 

Is homosexuality un-African?

Some comments from the vid:


David Bahati (Ugandan MP): homosexuality is inconsistent with our belief of continuity of family and clan

Sideeqah Tunde-Lawal (Muslim Nigerian): Its un-African because even though its human nature, its not something that is promoted.  the public display of affection affects sensibilities 

Latheem Gabriels (South African Muslim gay rights activist): I think Sideeqah, your attitude reflects many women from Middle-Eastern and North African countries of Islamic faith. The Qur’an promotes diversity. You’ve been informed by a patriarchal system that tells you what Islamic is or isn’t and what is African or un-African

Audience member: I am an African, we believe in the biblical point of view that homosexuality is wickedness. The only way for my semen to continue is through reproduction.

Nkunzi Nkabinde (Lesbian traditional South African healer): My ancestors accept me the way I am and allow me to have a wife. 

This was really interesting, not surprising and horrible to watch because it’s really hard, as a gay Nigerian to be watch half the panel dismiss a different sexuality. I don’t know how people will accept homosexuality. 

Very good show though there didn’t talk to much North Africans in the show which is a bummer. All 4 parts of the video are on youtube 

thefeeloffree:

A Prayer To My Queer Naijas
by Adaku Chinenye Utah
helloimedua:

tinymiyo:

Mr. Bigg’s is Nigeria’s first chain of fast food restaurants. Owned by conglomerate United African Company of Nigeria PLC, there are currently around 170 locations in Nigeria, including the country’s first drive-through restaurant, with another four locations in Ghana.
Gahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh 0_0 a picture of Mr Bigg’s on my dashboard. Its been 10 years since i had Mr Bigg’s. A freaking decade.

It’s so shit now :( Chicken Republic is the reigning restaurant. Sooo goooooood.

i miss Biggs :(

helloimedua:

tinymiyo:

Mr. Bigg’s is Nigeria’s first chain of fast food restaurants. Owned by conglomerate United African Company of Nigeria PLC, there are currently around 170 locations in Nigeria, including the country’s first drive-through restaurant, with another four locations in Ghana.

Gahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh 0_0 a picture of Mr Bigg’s on my dashboard. Its been 10 years since i had Mr Bigg’s. A freaking decade.

It’s so shit now :( Chicken Republic is the reigning restaurant. Sooo goooooood.

i miss Biggs :(

(via alwaystheoviereya)

Tags: nigeria

mamamantis:

nezua:

dynamicafrica:

prepaidafrica:

Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls.
The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.
(via Blog : Maker Faire Africa)

This is brilliant! These girls are incredible!

!!!

fourteen and fifteen, whoa
this is totally rad

mamamantis:

nezua:

dynamicafrica:

prepaidafrica:

Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls.

The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.

(via Blog : Maker Faire Africa)

This is brilliant! These girls are incredible!

!!!

fourteen and fifteen, whoa

this is totally rad

nok-ind:

The Yoruba Orisha (Part 2) 

An Orisha (also spelled Orisa or Orixa) is a spirit or deity that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba religious system. (Olodumare is also known by various other names includ
ing Olorun, Eledumare, Eleda and 

Olofin-Orun). This religion has found its way throughout the world and is now expressed in practices as varied as Candomblé, Lucumí/Santería, Shango in Trinidad, Anago and Oyotunji, as well as in some aspects of Umbanda, Winti, Obeah, Vodun and a host of others.

These varieties or spiritual lineages are practiced throughout areas of Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, Togo, Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela among others. As interest in Yoruba religion system grows, Orisha communities and lineages can be found in parts of Europe and Asia as well. While estimates may vary, some scholars believe that there could be more than 150 million adherents of this spiritual tradition worldwide.
(Please note some of the Orisha have male/female personifications)

(via africanbeats)

tarariot:

fredjoiner:

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie breaking it down…

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history. 

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even thought it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu’s dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him off, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

So much love for this woman <3

I get pissed off anytime I see or hear the words “Gouden Eeuw” (Golden Age). Dutch people are so proud that such a small country had such a big role in world politics, that we ‘controlled the seas’ with our fantastic VOC. Go fuck yourselves. It was golden for white people, and only because you were fucking killing and enslaving everyone else. Now you want to teach us all about how GREAT ‘we’ were and mention slavery like ‘oh yeah, and we transported slaves from here to there and this is what the ships looked like and scurvy and yeah so now we’re talking about pirates and shit because they’re much cooler BTW WE WERE POWNING EVERYONE EVEN THOUGH WE’RE TINY ISN’T THAT AWESOME ALSO SPICES WE WERE GOOD AT TRADING’. Just stfu. Please. If you’re going to belittle slavery, just STFU.

(via daughterofassata)